The Repeal Bill already facing challenges?

Yesterday the Repeal bill was published, but it has already run into some difficulties, with the Labour party and the devolved administrations threatening to block it.

The UK is only into the Brexit process by a few weeks, but it looks like the cracks are starting to show for the government, by not having the devolved administrations on side.

Government Ministers are confident about getting it through the commons and have promised an “ongoing intense dialogue” with the devolved administrations.

First Minster of Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon and First Minster of Wales, Carwyn Jones, described the bill as a “naked power-grab” by Westminster that undermined the principles of devolution.

The government is also facing criticism from inside the Labour Party, they claim it gives ministers a free hand over huge parts of policy without being scrutinized by Parliament.

From an outsider, it does appear that the government is being pushed and prodded from all angles, and with the shambolic general election result, this government authority does seem to be wavering.

However the Brexit Secretary David Davis, rejected the criticism and said its “one of the most significant pieces of legislation that has ever passed through Parliament”.

He also made the point that the bill does not give ministers “sweeping powers” to make changes to laws as they are repatriated.

The Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn, with his new found confidence, has said his party would not support the bill in its current form and called for concessions in six key areas.

These comments come after the Labour leader was in Brussels meeting the EU’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier.

During his visit Corbyn appeared to go on the attack. He said, “We will make sure there is full parliamentary scrutiny.”

He also added that “we have a Parliament where the government doesn’t have a majority, we have a country which voted in two ways on Leave or Remain.”

With the bill likely to pass in the commons, the Conservative government are just starting the trek through the two year battle ahead. What seems for certain is the UK becoming more and more divided on the Brexit issue.

 

 

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